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The Teamsters and the GOP Had a Moment Last Night

16 July 2024 at 18:56

On Monday night, after the triumphant entrance of former president and GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump, Teamsters Union general president Sean O’Brien addressed the Republican National Convention.

“I refuse to keep doing the same things my predecessors did,” O’Brien said. “Today, the Teamsters are here to say: ‘We are not beholden to anyone or any party.’”

As president of the 1.3 million member union, O’Brien has proved to be willing to work with Republicans even as the rest of the labor movement has rallied around Democrats. While the AFL-CIO, NEA, and UAW endorsed President Joe Biden’s reelection bid, O’Brien met privately with Trump and donated $45,000 to the Republican National Committee’s convention fund. (According to the Washington Post, it was the Teamsters’ first major donation to the GOP in years, though they also donated $135,000 to the Democratic National Convention last December.) O’Brien’s appearance at the RNC further signaled his willingness to break from recent Teamsters history—the union supported Trump’s opponents in 2016 and 2020.

But, on an economy-themed night at the convention, O’Brien did not endorse Trump and it’s unlikely his union ever will. O’Brien did praise Trump’s “backbone” for inviting him, over the objections of anti-labor Republicans. And, in the wake of the attempt on Trump’s life, O’Brien said, “He has proven to be one tough S.O.B.”

The Teamsters president, who has described himself as a “lifelong Democrat,” faced criticism from within his union over his budding relationship with Trump. As Mother Jones recently reported:

O’Brien’s critics from within the union argue that his appearance at the RNC will set a dangerous precedent at a potential turning point for American labor. Teamsters vice president at-large John Palmer has repeatedly publicly rebuked O’Brien’s involvement with Trump. In a recent op-ed in New Politics, he wrote that O’Brien’s speech at the RNC “only normalizes and makes the most anti-union party and President I’ve seen in my lifetime seem palatable.”

On Monday night, O’Brien acknowledged that the Teamsters and the GOP seldom agree on issues, but said that a “growing group” is willing to consider the union’s perspective. He named both Missouri senator Josh Hawley and vice presidential nominee, Ohio senator J.D. Vance. Hawley and Vance have both appeared at picket lines despite a history of opposing pro-union policies. They both spoke out against the Protecting the Right to Organize (PRO) Act, which would strengthen collective bargaining rights.

Not all of O’Brien’s points landed well with the convention’s audience. His urge for both parties to put “American workers first” elicited cheers, but the crowd’s enthusiasm waned as he described the need for legal protections for unionizing workers and labor law reform. “The biggest recipients of welfare in this country are corporations, and this is real corruption,” O’Brien said.

Trump, in particular, has proven to be weak on pro-union policies. As Mother Jones previously reported his administration dealt a series of blows to organized labor:

[Trump] reshaped the National Labor Relations Board, the federal agency that enforces labor law and investigates unfair labor practices. Led by a Trump appointee, the NLRB made what the Economic Policy Institute described as an “unprecedented” number of decisions “overturning existing worker protections.” The rulings constrained employees’ ability to form unions, organize at the workplace, and bargain with management. 

Trump’s appointees to the Supreme Court have supported a series of anti-labor rulings. In 2018, the court rejected a legal precedent that allowed public-sector unions to collect mandatory fees from nonmembers to support the cost of collective bargaining—a crucial source of revenue. Earlier this year, the Court sided with Starbucks in a case involving workers fired while they tried to form a union. The decision overturned an NLRB order to reinstate the workers.

It’s unclear if O’Brien will be given a chance to speak when the Democrats meet next month in Chicago. On Monday afternoon, O’Brien told Fox News anchor Neil Cavuto that he had not received a reply to his request to speak at the Democratic National Convention. “Crickets,” he said to Cavuto.

Later that day, Reuters reported that the Teamsters’ leadership is considering endorsing no one in the 2024 presidential race, because of “deep internal divisions” within the union. Such a decision would be a rebuke to Biden, who has campaigned on his pro-labor record. A Teamsters spokesperson told Reuters that no final decision has been made.

“At the end of the day,” O’Brien told the crowd gathered in Milwaukee, “the Teamsters are not interested if you have a D, R, or an I next to your name. We want to know one thing: what are you doing to help American workers?”

The Teamsters and the GOP Had a Moment Last Night

16 July 2024 at 18:56

On Monday night, after the triumphant entrance of former president and GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump, Teamsters Union general president Sean O’Brien addressed the Republican National Convention.

“I refuse to keep doing the same things my predecessors did,” O’Brien said. “Today, the Teamsters are here to say: ‘We are not beholden to anyone or any party.’”

As president of the 1.3 million member union, O’Brien has proved to be willing to work with Republicans even as the rest of the labor movement has rallied around Democrats. While the AFL-CIO, NEA, and UAW endorsed President Joe Biden’s reelection bid, O’Brien met privately with Trump and donated $45,000 to the Republican National Committee’s convention fund. (According to the Washington Post, it was the Teamsters’ first major donation to the GOP in years, though they also donated $135,000 to the Democratic National Convention last December.) O’Brien’s appearance at the RNC further signaled his willingness to break from recent Teamsters history—the union supported Trump’s opponents in 2016 and 2020.

But, on an economy-themed night at the convention, O’Brien did not endorse Trump and it’s unlikely his union ever will. O’Brien did praise Trump’s “backbone” for inviting him, over the objections of anti-labor Republicans. And, in the wake of the attempt on Trump’s life, O’Brien said, “He has proven to be one tough S.O.B.”

The Teamsters president, who has described himself as a “lifelong Democrat,” faced criticism from within his union over his budding relationship with Trump. As Mother Jones recently reported:

O’Brien’s critics from within the union argue that his appearance at the RNC will set a dangerous precedent at a potential turning point for American labor. Teamsters vice president at-large John Palmer has repeatedly publicly rebuked O’Brien’s involvement with Trump. In a recent op-ed in New Politics, he wrote that O’Brien’s speech at the RNC “only normalizes and makes the most anti-union party and President I’ve seen in my lifetime seem palatable.”

On Monday night, O’Brien acknowledged that the Teamsters and the GOP seldom agree on issues, but said that a “growing group” is willing to consider the union’s perspective. He named both Missouri senator Josh Hawley and vice presidential nominee, Ohio senator J.D. Vance. Hawley and Vance have both appeared at picket lines despite a history of opposing pro-union policies. They both spoke out against the Protecting the Right to Organize (PRO) Act, which would strengthen collective bargaining rights.

Not all of O’Brien’s points landed well with the convention’s audience. His urge for both parties to put “American workers first” elicited cheers, but the crowd’s enthusiasm waned as he described the need for legal protections for unionizing workers and labor law reform. “The biggest recipients of welfare in this country are corporations, and this is real corruption,” O’Brien said.

Trump, in particular, has proven to be weak on pro-union policies. As Mother Jones previously reported his administration dealt a series of blows to organized labor:

[Trump] reshaped the National Labor Relations Board, the federal agency that enforces labor law and investigates unfair labor practices. Led by a Trump appointee, the NLRB made what the Economic Policy Institute described as an “unprecedented” number of decisions “overturning existing worker protections.” The rulings constrained employees’ ability to form unions, organize at the workplace, and bargain with management. 

Trump’s appointees to the Supreme Court have supported a series of anti-labor rulings. In 2018, the court rejected a legal precedent that allowed public-sector unions to collect mandatory fees from nonmembers to support the cost of collective bargaining—a crucial source of revenue. Earlier this year, the Court sided with Starbucks in a case involving workers fired while they tried to form a union. The decision overturned an NLRB order to reinstate the workers.

It’s unclear if O’Brien will be given a chance to speak when the Democrats meet next month in Chicago. On Monday afternoon, O’Brien told Fox News anchor Neil Cavuto that he had not received a reply to his request to speak at the Democratic National Convention. “Crickets,” he said to Cavuto.

Later that day, Reuters reported that the Teamsters’ leadership is considering endorsing no one in the 2024 presidential race, because of “deep internal divisions” within the union. Such a decision would be a rebuke to Biden, who has campaigned on his pro-labor record. A Teamsters spokesperson told Reuters that no final decision has been made.

“At the end of the day,” O’Brien told the crowd gathered in Milwaukee, “the Teamsters are not interested if you have a D, R, or an I next to your name. We want to know one thing: what are you doing to help American workers?”

Why Donald Trump’s Plan to Stop Taxing Tips Is a Lame Political Stunt

12 July 2024 at 22:00

This story was originally published on Judd Legum’s Substack, Popular Information, to which you can subscribe here.

As president, Donald Trump’s tax policy heavily favored corporations and the wealthy. Trump’s signature tax legislation, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, overwhelmingly benefited those groups

But as a presidential candidate, Trump campaigns as a populist. In his 2024 campaign, he’s touting a proposal to end federal taxation on tips. He made the announcement last month in Nevada, a key battleground state with a large service industry that relies on tips. 

“For those hotel workers and people that get tips, you’re going to be very happy, because when I get to office, we are going to not charge taxes on tips,” Trump said. “We’re going to do that right away first thing in office because it’s been a point of contention for years and years and years, and you do a great job of service.” 

This week, Trump’s proposal to end taxes on tips was one of 20 “promises” included in the official 2024 Republican Party platform: “LARGE TAX CUTS FOR WORKERS, AND NO TAX ON TIPS!”

Trump’s plan to end taxes on tips may help him politically with service industry workers. His campaign is urging people to write “Vote for Trump for NO TAX ON TIPS!” on their restaurant receipts.


Republicans in Congress have already introduced legislation to implement Trump’s plan and end federal taxation of tips. Notably, the bill would only exempt tips from income taxes, and not payroll taxes, which represents the majority of federal taxes owed by low-income workers. 

Only the best-paid workers would benefit, but why should a waiter who earns $60,000 a year pay less taxes than someone making the same amount in a grocery store?

But the proposal, if it were ever implemented, could have a detrimental effect on most tipped workers. The primary beneficiaries would be people who own and operate hotels, restaurants, and other businesses that employ tipped workers—in other words, people like Trump. 

First, many people who rely on tips earn so little money that they already pay no federal income taxes. For example, half of all servers earn $32,000 or less. A server with a family who earns $32,000 does not owe any federal income tax and, therefore, would not benefit at all from Trump’s proposal. 

The bigger issue is that the federal minimum wage for tipped workers is $2.13 an hour. The tipped minimum wage has not increased since 1991. Combined with tips, these workers are supposed to earn a minimum of $7.25 an hour. That is not close to a living wage in the United States in 2024. 

As a result, seven states (Alaska, California, Minnesota, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington) have eliminated the tipped minimum wage and require all employers to pay their employees the same minimum wage regardless of whether they receive tips. The Biden Administration requires “federal contractors to pay tipped workers the same minimum wages as others.” Major cities like New York and Chicago have recently implemented similar policies. Numerous other cities and states are considering following suit. 

The hotel and restaurant industry has been desperate to halt the momentum of state initiatives to raise the minimum wage. The National Restaurant Association, which represents restaurant owners, has endorsed Trump’s proposal

Historically, “many restaurants and rail operators embraced tipping because it allowed them to ‘hire’ newly freed slaves without having to pay them.”

Eliminating taxation on tips could sap support from efforts both to eliminate the tipped minimum wage and raise the minimum wage overall. While most service industry workers would receive little or no benefit from eliminating income taxes on tips, many would benefit from increasing their minimum wage to $15 an hour or higher. The Tax Policy Center notes that this tradeoff would be particularly brutal for “‘back of the house’ staff such as dishwashers, who often receive only a small share of tips, enough to qualify as tipped workers but not enough to live on, or to pay taxes.”

That’s why the Restaurant Workers United, a labor union that represents many of the industry’s workers, opposes Trump’s plan. “The call to end taxes on tips is just a misguided way of trying to fix a problem of uplifting the lower class,” Elyanna Calle, a bartender and RWU organizer in Austin, said. Saru Jayaraman, president of the labor advocacy group One Fair Wage, calls Trump’s proposal “not just the wrong solution, but a fake solution.”

There are some tipped employees—including the 10 percent of servers that earn $60,000 or more—who would significantly benefit from ending income taxes on tips. But why should these higher-paid tipped workers get a special tax benefit while those making the same income in industries without tips are excluded? Why should a waiter who earns $60,000 a year pay less taxes than someone making the same amount in a warehouse or a grocery store? 

There is no clear answer to these questions, other than the proposal to end taxes on tips may have political benefits for Trump.

Ending federal taxation of tips could prompt more industries to shift from paying wages to soliciting tips. In addition to potential tax benefits for employees, it would transfer some of the responsibility for paying workers from the business to its customers. For example, the Wall Street Journal notes that “[a]n auto-body shop could restrain its prices and wages and strongly encourage tipping as a way to get untaxed income to workers.”

If there is a significant shift to tipping over wages, it would also increase the cost of the proposal. The Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget estimates that incentivizing more tipping by ending federal taxation could cost the federal government up to $500 billion over 10 years.

According to the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, “tipping in the United States is rooted in a racist system which was designed to keep African Americans in an economically and socially subordinate position following the end of slavery.”

Prior to the Civil War, notes a conference fact sheet, “tipping was frowned upon: it was viewed by many as an aristocratic, European practice that was incompatible with American democracy.” But after the elimination of slavery, “many restaurants and rail operators embraced tipping because it allowed them to ‘hire’ newly freed slaves without having to pay them—they would be forced to work for tips alone.” The practice was designed “to keep African Americans in an economically and socially subordinate position.” 

Even today, it continues, “40 percent of people who work for tips are people of color.” Further, studies show that “customers discriminate against African-American servers, consistently tipping them less than White servers regardless of the quality of service.”

The movement to end the tipped minimum wage to create a single fair wage for all workers is about recognizing the dignity and worth of all workers. Trump’s proposal would push the United States in the opposite direction, making millions of Americans even more dependent on wealthy patrons. 

Why Donald Trump’s Plan to Stop Taxing Tips Is a Lame Political Stunt

12 July 2024 at 22:00

This story was originally published on Judd Legum’s Substack, Popular Information, to which you can subscribe here.

As president, Donald Trump’s tax policy heavily favored corporations and the wealthy. Trump’s signature tax legislation, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, overwhelmingly benefited those groups

But as a presidential candidate, Trump campaigns as a populist. In his 2024 campaign, he’s touting a proposal to end federal taxation on tips. He made the announcement last month in Nevada, a key battleground state with a large service industry that relies on tips. 

“For those hotel workers and people that get tips, you’re going to be very happy, because when I get to office, we are going to not charge taxes on tips,” Trump said. “We’re going to do that right away first thing in office because it’s been a point of contention for years and years and years, and you do a great job of service.” 

This week, Trump’s proposal to end taxes on tips was one of 20 “promises” included in the official 2024 Republican Party platform: “LARGE TAX CUTS FOR WORKERS, AND NO TAX ON TIPS!”

Trump’s plan to end taxes on tips may help him politically with service industry workers. His campaign is urging people to write “Vote for Trump for NO TAX ON TIPS!” on their restaurant receipts.


Republicans in Congress have already introduced legislation to implement Trump’s plan and end federal taxation of tips. Notably, the bill would only exempt tips from income taxes, and not payroll taxes, which represents the majority of federal taxes owed by low-income workers. 

Only the best-paid workers would benefit, but why should a waiter who earns $60,000 a year pay less taxes than someone making the same amount in a grocery store?

But the proposal, if it were ever implemented, could have a detrimental effect on most tipped workers. The primary beneficiaries would be people who own and operate hotels, restaurants, and other businesses that employ tipped workers—in other words, people like Trump. 

First, many people who rely on tips earn so little money that they already pay no federal income taxes. For example, half of all servers earn $32,000 or less. A server with a family who earns $32,000 does not owe any federal income tax and, therefore, would not benefit at all from Trump’s proposal. 

The bigger issue is that the federal minimum wage for tipped workers is $2.13 an hour. The tipped minimum wage has not increased since 1991. Combined with tips, these workers are supposed to earn a minimum of $7.25 an hour. That is not close to a living wage in the United States in 2024. 

As a result, seven states (Alaska, California, Minnesota, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington) have eliminated the tipped minimum wage and require all employers to pay their employees the same minimum wage regardless of whether they receive tips. The Biden Administration requires “federal contractors to pay tipped workers the same minimum wages as others.” Major cities like New York and Chicago have recently implemented similar policies. Numerous other cities and states are considering following suit. 

The hotel and restaurant industry has been desperate to halt the momentum of state initiatives to raise the minimum wage. The National Restaurant Association, which represents restaurant owners, has endorsed Trump’s proposal

Historically, “many restaurants and rail operators embraced tipping because it allowed them to ‘hire’ newly freed slaves without having to pay them.”

Eliminating taxation on tips could sap support from efforts both to eliminate the tipped minimum wage and raise the minimum wage overall. While most service industry workers would receive little or no benefit from eliminating income taxes on tips, many would benefit from increasing their minimum wage to $15 an hour or higher. The Tax Policy Center notes that this tradeoff would be particularly brutal for “‘back of the house’ staff such as dishwashers, who often receive only a small share of tips, enough to qualify as tipped workers but not enough to live on, or to pay taxes.”

That’s why the Restaurant Workers United, a labor union that represents many of the industry’s workers, opposes Trump’s plan. “The call to end taxes on tips is just a misguided way of trying to fix a problem of uplifting the lower class,” Elyanna Calle, a bartender and RWU organizer in Austin, said. Saru Jayaraman, president of the labor advocacy group One Fair Wage, calls Trump’s proposal “not just the wrong solution, but a fake solution.”

There are some tipped employees—including the 10 percent of servers that earn $60,000 or more—who would significantly benefit from ending income taxes on tips. But why should these higher-paid tipped workers get a special tax benefit while those making the same income in industries without tips are excluded? Why should a waiter who earns $60,000 a year pay less taxes than someone making the same amount in a warehouse or a grocery store? 

There is no clear answer to these questions, other than the proposal to end taxes on tips may have political benefits for Trump.

Ending federal taxation of tips could prompt more industries to shift from paying wages to soliciting tips. In addition to potential tax benefits for employees, it would transfer some of the responsibility for paying workers from the business to its customers. For example, the Wall Street Journal notes that “[a]n auto-body shop could restrain its prices and wages and strongly encourage tipping as a way to get untaxed income to workers.”

If there is a significant shift to tipping over wages, it would also increase the cost of the proposal. The Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget estimates that incentivizing more tipping by ending federal taxation could cost the federal government up to $500 billion over 10 years.

According to the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, “tipping in the United States is rooted in a racist system which was designed to keep African Americans in an economically and socially subordinate position following the end of slavery.”

Prior to the Civil War, notes a conference fact sheet, “tipping was frowned upon: it was viewed by many as an aristocratic, European practice that was incompatible with American democracy.” But after the elimination of slavery, “many restaurants and rail operators embraced tipping because it allowed them to ‘hire’ newly freed slaves without having to pay them—they would be forced to work for tips alone.” The practice was designed “to keep African Americans in an economically and socially subordinate position.” 

Even today, it continues, “40 percent of people who work for tips are people of color.” Further, studies show that “customers discriminate against African-American servers, consistently tipping them less than White servers regardless of the quality of service.”

The movement to end the tipped minimum wage to create a single fair wage for all workers is about recognizing the dignity and worth of all workers. Trump’s proposal would push the United States in the opposite direction, making millions of Americans even more dependent on wealthy patrons. 

The Teamsters President Is Courting Trump—Despite His Anti-Labor Record

11 July 2024 at 16:35

Teamsters union general president Sean O’Brien is set to speak at the Republican National Convention next week—the culmination of several months of courting former president Donald Trump despite his anti-labor record. 

With 1.3 million members, the Teamsters are one of largest and most powerful unions in the United States—and its leaders have not yet issued an endorsement in the 2024 presidential race. Representatives have emphasized that O’Brien’s speech at the RNC does not amount to one and that O’Brien also requested to speak at the Democratic National Convention in August. Spokesperson Kara Deniz told Mother Jones that the DNC has not responded to their request. 

Still, O’Brien’s planned visit to the RNC sets the Teamsters apart from other influential labor unions, who have largely rallied behind President Joe Biden’s re-election bid. Biden, who claimed the title of “the most pro-union president in American history,” has already been endorsed by several other major unions, including the AFL-CIO, NEA, and UAW.

O’Brien’s speech at the RNC “only normalizes and makes the most anti-union party and President I’ve seen in my lifetime seem palatable.”

Experts say it’s unlikely that the Teamsters’ endorsement—which requires a poll of the general executive board—will go to Trump. Nevertheless, O’Brien’s critics from within the union argue that his appearance at the RNC will set a dangerous precedent at a potential turning point for American labor. Teamsters vice president at-large John Palmer has repeatedly publicly rebuked O’Brien’s involvement with Trump. In a recent op-ed in New Politics, he wrote that O’Brien’s speech at the RNC “only normalizes and makes the most anti-union party and President I’ve seen in my lifetime seem palatable.”

The Trump administration dealt a series of blows to organized labor—the effects of which are still felt today. Yet an NBC poll conducted in January found that, while Biden is still faring better than Trump in union households, his lead is slimmer than it was in 2020. Some pundits say this slip is an indication that Biden is out of touch with the working class. After Biden met with AFL-CIO leaders on Wednesday, FOX Business host Larry Kudlow predicted that cost-of-living increases under Biden will drive rank-and-file members to vote for Trump. “Biden will win the union leaders, but Trump is going to take most of the rank-and-file who go to work every day, play by the rules, work with their hands and proudly wear their hard hats,” he said. “You can bet on that.” 

In January, O’Brien met privately with Trump at Mar-a-Lago, where the two posed for a photo with matching thumbs up. Later that month, the former president sat down with Teamsters leadership and rank-and-file members as part of a series of “presidential roundtables” at the union’s headquarters in Washington, DC. Speaking to reporters after the meeting, Trump teased the possibility of a Teamsters endorsement, despite the union, under O’Brien’s predecessor, endorsing Hillary Clinton in 2016 and Joe Biden in 2020. 

“Stranger things have happened,” Trump said. 

Labor unions are no longer the “behemoth” political forces they were in the 20th century, said David Macdonald, a political science professor at University of Florida. But their endorsement in the presidential race still carries weight and could influence undecided members in key swing states. 

The Teamsters have a history of endorsing Republicans even as the labor movement embraced Democrats. The Teamsters were the only major union to back Ronald Reagan in 1980 and 1984, and George H.W. Bush in 1988. 

Though Trump touts his support for the American working class, his record is staunchly anti-union. He reshaped the National Labor Relations Board, the federal agency that enforces labor law and investigates unfair labor practices. Led by a Trump appointee, the NLRB made what the Economic Policy Institute described as an “unprecedented” number of decisions “overturning existing worker protections.” The rulings constrained employees’ ability to form unions, organize at the workplace, and bargain with management.  

Trump’s appointees to the Supreme Court have supported a series of anti-labor rulings. In 2018, the court rejected a legal precedent that allowed public-sector unions to collect mandatory fees from nonmembers to support the cost of collective bargaining—a crucial source of revenue. Earlier this year, the Court sided with Starbucks in a case involving workers fired while they tried to form a union. The decision overturned an NLRB order to reinstate the workers.   

Biden’s progressive appointees to the NLRB included Jennifer Abruzzo, who has been hailed as a champion of worker’s rights. The board has worked to undo decisions made under Trump and, according to an analysis from the think tank Center for American Progress, reinstated more workers in one year than during the entire Trump administration. Additionally, Biden appeared at a UAW picket line in Michigan last year and signaled support for workers unionizing at Amazon in 2022. 

“Biden [has been] arguing that unions are an important part of a healthy democracy and a healthy economy, and urging workers to unionize,” said Joseph McCartin, a professor of labor history at Georgetown. “We haven’t seen that kind of leadership from the White House, arguably, since the New Deal era.” 

Trump, meanwhile, has tried to drive a wedge between union leadership and rank-and-file members over Biden. Last October, while the UAW was on strike, Trump addressed a recorded message to auto workers about Biden’s push for electric vehicles, arguing that union leaders who support Biden do not have workers’ best interests in mind. “And it doesn’t matter how bad they are, they’ll endorse a Democrat,” he said, “even though the Democrat’s selling you down the tubes.” 

O’Brien, weighing the chances of a second Trump presidency, may be making a calculated decision to develop a relationship with Trump. Or he could simply be responding to the significant number of Teamsters members who are Republicans. In a press release about Trump’s visit to Teamster headquarters, O’Brien noted that the union’s members “represent every political background.” Palmer, the union’s vice president, told Mother Jones that straw polls of members showed that around 46 percent supported Biden while around 37 percent supported Trump.

Straw polls of Teamsters members showed that around 46 percent supported Biden while around 37 percent supported Trump.

Nelson Lichtenstein, a professor of labor history at University of California, Santa Barbara, said that O’Brien may be hoping to justify an eventual Biden endorsement to his Republican members. Some members found this idea distasteful. “They should not be catering to these Confederates within our union,” said Chris Silvera, secretary-treasurer of a Teamsters unit in Long Island City, New York. 

Richard Hooker, secretary-treasurer of a unit in Philadelphia, told Mother Jones that leadership should instead focus on “aggressively educating” members on how another Trump administration could harm the labor movement. He hopes O’Brien will have a “mic drop” moment at the RNC. If O’Brien doesn’t condemn Trump, Hooker says, the Teamsters need to have “some tough conversations” about how to move forward. 

IATSE Releases the Full Details of Their Tentative Deal; Sets Dates For Ratification Vote

10 July 2024 at 23:00
IATSE has published the Memorandums of Agreement for the Hollywood Basic, Videotape and Area Standard Agreements–which is the specific contract language of the tentative deals reached between IATSE and the AMPTP–ahead of a ratification vote that begins on Monday. Eligible IATSE members will vote on whether to ratify these agreements between July 14-17, with the […]

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