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Before yesterdaytravel.state.gov: Travel Advisories

Bhutan - Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

Reissued after periodic review without changes.

Exercise normal precautions in Bhutan.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Bhutan.

If you decide to travel to Bhutan:

Senegal - Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

Reissued with obsolete COVID-19 page links removed.      

Exercise normal precautions in Senegal. Some areas have increased risk.  Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Exercise Increased Caution in:

  • The Casamance region due to crime and landmines.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Senegal.

If you decide to travel to Senegal: 

Casamance Region – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution
There are sporadic reports of armed banditry in the Casamance region.

Landmines from prior conflicts remain a concern in the region.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in the Casamance region. U.S. government employees are required to coordinate all travel to the area with security officials and any travel off the main routes generally requires additional security measures (e.g. driving in a caravan of multiple vehicles, consulting local security officials, or carrying personal travel locaters). U.S. government employees are also prohibited from travelling after dark anywhere in the Casamance region.

Tajikistan - Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

27 November 2023 at 05:00

Reissued after periodic review with updates to risk indicators, Level 3 areas, and the “If you decide to travel” section.

Exercise increased caution in Tajikistan due to terrorism, unexploded landmines, and occasional violence near the border with Kyrgyzstan. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Reconsider travel to:

  • Within five miles of Tajikistan’s border with Afghanistan
  • Gorno-Badakhshon Autonomous Oblast

Country Summary: Terrorist organizations are known to have a presence in the region and have targeted foreigners and local authorities in the past.

Terrorist attacks can happen with little or no warning, with terrorists targeting public areas such as tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, restaurants, places of worship, school campuses, and government facilities.

Unexploded landmines and cluster munitions are a hazard along the Afghan-Tajik and Uzbek-Tajik borders, as well as in the Vakhsh and Rasht valleys. Heed land mine warning signs. Do not venture off the road into areas marked with red and white plastic tape. Avoid roadside ditches, shoulders, and unmarked trails. Never touch anything resembling unexploded munitions.

Be cautious when traveling within five miles of the Tajikistan-Kyrgyzstan border. There have been several instances of armed skirmishes between Tajik and Kyrgyz border guards over the past five years, particularly in the Isfara area and the Vorukh enclave.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Tajikistan.

If you decide to travel to Tajikistan:

  • Have a plan to depart Tajikistan which does not rely on U.S. government assistance.
  • Keep a low profile.
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Monitor local media for breaking events and be prepared to adjust your plans.
  • Do not touch unknown metal objects and avoid traveling off well-used roads, tracks, and paths due to risk of unexploded ordnance.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Review the Country Security Report for Tajikistan.
  • Follow the Department of State on  Facebook and Twitter.
  • Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Border Areas with Afghanistan – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel within five miles of Tajikistan's border with Afghanistan due to terrorism. The current political situation in Afghanistan creates a challenging and unpredictable environment in the border areas due to evolving security conditions. Additionally, the land border between Tajikistan and Afghanistan has been closed since the Taliban takeover of Afghanistan in 2021. Travel in the mountainous region along the Afghan border can be dangerous due to the proximity of militant groups across the border. U.S. citizens should remain alert and avoid activities that develop predictable patterns of movement. If documenting travel on social media, please ensure your privacy settings are appropriately set.

Gorno-Badakhshon Autonomous Oblast (GBAO)– Level 3: Reconsider Travel

The challenging and unpredictable environment in northern Afghanistan has the potential to spill over insecurity into neighboring Tajikistan’s GBAO region. GBAO is a restricted region for non-Tajik citizens, requiring a travel permits from Tajik authorities. Violent clashes with security forces erupted in GBAO in recent years, and the government of Tajikistan can suspend travel permits for non-Tajik citizens on short notice. 

Please visit our website for information on Travel to High-Risk Areas.

 

Iceland - Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Exercise normal precautions in Iceland.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Iceland.

If you decide to travel to Iceland: 

Mainland China, Hong Kong & Macau - See Summaries - Level 3: Reconsider Travel

12 April 2024 at 04:00

Updated due to new national security legislation in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region.

Summary: Reconsider travel to Mainland China due to the arbitrary enforcement of local laws, including in relation to exit bans, and the risk of wrongful detentions.

Exercise increased caution when traveling to the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (SAR) due to the arbitrary enforcement of local laws.

Reconsider travel to the Macau Special Administrative Region (SAR) due to a limited ability to provide emergency consular services. Exercise increased caution when traveling to the Macau SAR due to the arbitrary enforcement of local laws.

See specific risks and conditions in each jurisdiction

Zambia - Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

Reissued with obsolete COVID-19 page links removed.

Exercise normal precautions in Zambia. 

Read the country information page for additional information about travel to Zambia.

If you decide to travel to Zambia: 

Armenia - Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Updated to reflect changes in the Do Not Travel section.

Exercise increased caution in Armenia due to areas of armed conflict. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do Not Travel To:

  • The border region with Azerbaijan.

U.S. Embassy Employees and their families remain prohibited from any non-essential travel to the following areas:

  • Gegharkunik region east of Vardenis.
  • Syunik region east of Goris;
  • Syunik region south of Kapan;
  • Travel through Yeraskh village in Ararat region is allowed, stopping is not.

Country Summary:
U.S. citizens should exercise increased caution in Armenia. Further military activity could occur in the region.  

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Armenia.

If you decide to travel to Armenia:

Border with Azerbaijan – Level 4: Do Not Travel

There is the potential for armed conflict near the Armenia-Azerbaijan border. U.S. citizens should avoid the area. Exercise caution on roads near Armenia’s border with Azerbaijan. Be aware that some portions of the road may cross international boundaries without notice. Roads may be controlled by checkpoints or closed to travelers without notice.  The U.S. embassy has prohibited embassy employees and their families from non-essential travel to the border region, as well as other areas of Armenia listed above.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

 

Syria - Level 4: Do Not Travel

Updated to reflect the risk of wrongful detention

Do not travel to Syria due to the risk of terrorism, civil unrest, kidnapping or hostage taking, and armed conflict. Exercise increased caution due to the risk of wrongful detention.

Country Summary: The U.S. Embassy in Damascus suspended its operations in February 2012. Czechia serves as the protecting power for the United States in Syria. The U.S. government is unable to provide any routine or emergency consular services to U.S. citizens in Syria.

Syria has experienced active armed conflict since 2011. No part of Syria is safe from violence. Hostage taking by armed groups, wrongful detentions, the use of chemical warfare, shelling, and aerial bombardment of civilian centers pose significant risk of death or serious injury. The destruction of infrastructure, housing, medical facilities, schools, and power and water utilities has also increased hardships inside the country.

The U.S. government strongly warns private U.S. citizens against traveling to Syria to engage in armed conflict. The U.S. government does not support this activity. U.S. citizens who undertake such activity face extreme personal risks, including hostage taking by armed groups, wrongful detentions, injury, or death. Our ability to provide consular assistance to individuals who are injured or kidnapped, or to the families of individuals who die in the conflict, is extremely limited.

Protests and demonstrations are quelled by government forces through aggressive tactics and protestors, activists, and political dissenters are routinely detained without access to legal representation or the ability to communicate with friends and family.

Terrorist groups are active in Syria. Parts of Syria have experienced recent increases in incidents of bombings, IEDs, and assassinations. Fighting on behalf of or providing other forms of support to designated terrorist organizations, including ISIS and al-Qaeda affiliates, can constitute the provision of material support for terrorism or a foreign terrorist organization, which is a crime under U.S. law that can result in penalties including prison time and large fines.

There is an ongoing risk of hostage taking of U.S. citizens and other foreign nationals throughout the country. U.S. citizens are also targets of abduction and/or wrongful detention by the Syrian government. Those in detention do not have access to fair judicial process or medical attention. Government detention centers are known to be unsanitary facilities where widespread cruel, inhumane, or degrading treatment of detainees has been documented, as well as torture and extrajudicial killings. Minors, persons with physical, sensory, or mental disabilities, and elderly have frequently been victims of unjust detention. The Syrian government has also been implicated in the enforced or involuntary disappearance of more than 100,000 individuals, including medical and humanitarian workers, journalists, human rights activists, political opposition, and additionally those suspected of affiliation with these groups and their family members. Only the Syrian government can issue a valid entry visa to Syria. Failure to obtain a legitimate entry visa directly from the Syrian government could result in detention.

Due to risks of operating civilian aircraft within or in the vicinity of Syria, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued a Notice to Air Missions (NOTAM) and/or a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR). For more information, U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Syria.

If you decide to travel to Syria:

  • Visit our website on Travel to High Risk Areas.
  • Draft a will and designate appropriate insurance beneficiaries and/or power of attorney.
  • Establish a proof of life protocol with your family, so that if you are taken hostage, your family knows specific questions (and answers) to ask the hostage-takers to be sure that you are alive and to rule out a hoax.
  • Leave DNA samples with your medical provider in case it is necessary for your family to access them.
  • Share important documents, login information, and points of contact with family so that they can manage your affairs if you are unable to return as planned to the United States.
  • Develop a communication plan with family and/or your employer or host organization so that they can monitor your safety and location as you travel through high-risk areas. This plan should specify who you would contact first, and how they should share the information.
  • Enroll your trip in the State Department's Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter/X.
  • Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Bolivia - Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Reissued after annual review.

Exercise increased caution in Bolivia due to civil unrest. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do not travel to:

  • Chapare region due to crime.

Country Summary: Demonstrations, strikes, and roadblocks can occur at any time in Bolivia. Demonstrations can result in violence. Roadblocks and strikes may cut off traffic and restrict the flow of goods and services around the country. Domestic and international flights may be delayed or unexpectedly cancelled.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Bolivia.

If you decide to travel to Bolivia:

Chapare Region: Do Not Travel

Due to a high level of violent crime, the U.S. government is limited in its ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in the Chapare region. U.S. government employees must obtain special authorization to travel there.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Taiwan - Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

Reissued after periodic review with minor edits.

Exercise normal precautions in Taiwan.

Read the Taiwan International Travel Information page for additional information on travel to Taiwan.

If you decide to travel to Taiwan:

Rwanda - Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

29 March 2024 at 04:00

Reissued with updates to add area of Level 3.

Exercise normal precautions in Rwanda. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Exercise Increased Caution in:

  • The Rwanda-Burundi border due to armed violence.

Reconsider Travel to:

  • The Rwanda-Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) border due to armed violence.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Rwanda.

If you decide to travel to Rwanda:

Rwanda-Burundi Border—Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution
The Nyungwe Forest National Park abuts the border with Burundi. Borders may not be clearly marked. It is required to obtain permits from the Rwanda Development Board prior to entry. Relations between Burundi and Rwanda are tense and there have been cross-border incursions and armed violence.

Rwanda-Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) Border – Level 3: Reconsider Travel
Armed groups operate in DRC’s North and South Kivu provinces and Virunga Park which is adjacent to Volcanoes National Park in Rwanda. The area has experienced escalating levels of armed conflict which could spill across poorly marked borders. Permits are required from the Rwanda Development Board prior to entry to Volcanoes National Park in Rwanda.

Uruguay - Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Reissued with obsolete COVID-19 page links removed.

Exercise increased caution in Uruguay due to crime.

Country Summary: Crime is most prevalent in the Montevideo, Canelones and Rivera departments. Violent crimes, such as homicides, armed robberies, car jackings, and thefts occur throughout the country and in urban areas frequented by U.S. government personnel, day and night. Criminals commonly travel in pairs on motorcycles to approach unsuspecting victims with a weapon and demand personal belongings. Armed criminals also target grocery stores, restaurants, financial centers, and small businesses, in which innocent bystanders are often victimized.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Uruguay.

If you decide to travel to Uruguay:

  • Be aware of your surroundings especially when traveling to tourist locations or poorly lit areas.
  • Call 911 if you encounter a crime in progress. Do not physically resist any robbery attempt or try to stop a robbery in progress.
  • Be vigilant when visiting banks or using ATMs during non-daylight hours or in remote locations; criminals often target ATMs and businesses in the early morning hours.
  • Do not leave valuable objects in parked vehicles or in plain sight when driving.
  • Do not display signs of wealth, such as wearing expensive jewelry or watches.
  • Review your personal and residential security plans.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Country Security Report for Uruguay.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
  • Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

Barbados - Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

Reissued with obsolete COVID-19 page links removed.

Exercise normal precautions in Barbados.  

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Barbados.

If you decide to travel to Barbados:

North Korea - Level 4: Do Not Travel

Reissued with obsolete COVID-19 page links removed.

Do not travel to North Korea due to the continuing serious risk of arrest and long-term detention of U.S. nationals. Exercise increased caution to North Korea due to the critical threat of wrongful detention.

  • All U.S. passports are invalid for travel to, in, or through the DPRK unless specially validated for such travel under the authority of the Secretary of State. 
  • Special validations are granted only in very limited circumstances. More information on how to apply for the special validation is available here.

The U.S. government is unable to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in North Korea as it does not have diplomatic or consular relations with North Korea. Sweden serves as the protecting power for the United States in North Korea, providing limited emergency services. The North Korean government routinely delays or denies Swedish officials access to detained U.S. citizens.

Due to risks to civil aviation operating within or in the vicinity of North Korea, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued a Notice to Air Missions (NOTAM) and/or a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR). For more information U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to North Korea.

If you receive a special validation to travel to North Korea:

  • Draft a will and designate appropriate insurance beneficiaries and/or power of attorney.
  • Discuss a plan with loved ones regarding care/custody of children, pets, property, belongings, non-liquid assets (collections, artwork, etc.), funeral wishes, etc.
  • Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Chad - Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reissued with obsolete COVID-19 page links removed.

Reconsider travel to Chad due to crime, terrorism, civil unrest, and kidnapping.  Some areas have increased risk.  Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do Not Travel to:

  • Lake Chad region due to terrorism.
  • Borders with Central African Republic, Libya, and Sudan due to armed conflict and minefields.

Country Summary: Violent crimes, such as armed robbery, carjacking, kidnapping, and muggings, have occurred in Chad.

Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting foreigners, local security forces, and civilians.

Demonstrations occur sporadically and have on occasion resulted in violence or use of tear gas by authorities. The U.S. Government has extremely limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Chad as U.S. Government employees must obtain special authorization to travel outside of the capital.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Chad.

If you decide to travel to Chad:

Lake Chad Region – Do Not Travel

Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting foreigners, local security forces, and civilians. Terrorists can easily cross borders. Government security forces may restrict civilian movement and engage in military operations with limited warning.

The U.S. Government has extremely limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Chad, particularly in the Lake Chad Basin.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

 Central African Republic, Libya, and Sudan Borders – Do Not Travel

Armed non-governmental groups operate along Chad’s southern border with Central African Republic, Sudan, and in Libya and northern Chad.

There are unmapped and undocumented minefields along the borders with both Libya and Sudan.

The U.S. Government has extremely limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Chad, particularly in border areas with Central African Republic, Libya and Sudan.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Hungary - Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

Reissued with obsolete COVID-19 page links removed.

Exercise normal precautions in Hungary.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Hungary.

If you decide to travel to Hungary:

 

Malta - Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

Reissued with obsolete COVID-19 page links removed.

Exercise normal precautions in Malta.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Malta.

If you decide to travel to Malta:

Burma (Myanmar) - Level 4: Do Not Travel

Updated Country Summary, to include information about implementation of a conscription law, and changes to the “If you decide to travel to Burma” section.

Do not travel to Burma due to civil unrest, armed conflict, and arbitrary enforcement of local laws. Reconsider travel to Burma due to limited and/or inadequate healthcare and emergency medical resources, and areas with land mines and unexploded ordnances. Exercise increased caution due to wrongful detentions.

COUNTRY SUMMARY: The Burma military regime detained and deposed elected government officials in a February 2021 coup d'état. Protests and demonstrations against military rule continue, often on significant dates. The military has responded to those protests by arbitrarily detaining individuals and with the indiscriminate use of deadly force against protesters and bystanders.

The Department of State has determined that the risk of wrongful detention of U.S. nationals by the military regime exists.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Burma due to security concerns amidst the ongoing armed conflict. This may be of particular concern to crime victims outside of Rangoon.

To mitigate safety and security risks, U.S. government employees’ dependents, under the age of 21, cannot reside in Burma with their U.S. government parent assigned to work in Burma.

Civil unrest and armed conflict occur throughout Burma. The level of civil unrest and armed conflict varies significantly between and within states and regions and may change at any time.

Civil unrest and armed violence due to fighting between the military regime and various ethnic groups and militias occur particularly in parts of Chin, Kachin, Kayin, Rakhine, and Shan States, as well as in Sagaing and Magway regions.

Improvised explosive devices (IEDs) are used in the ongoing armed conflicts, including within the greater Rangoon area. From January to December 2023, the U.S. Embassy in Rangoon calculated an average of fifteen IEDs per month detonated against regime targets, while an average of eight unexploded IEDs were discovered and safely disposed of per month by security authorities. Outside of Rangoon, there have been IED attacks against checkpoints and other critical infrastructure.

While land mines and unexploded ordnance (UXO) exist throughout Burma, NGOs working on this issue state the greatest concerns are in Shan, Chin, and Kachin State. The locations of landmines and UXO are often not marked or otherwise unidentifiable.

The military regime arbitrarily enforces local laws, including often detaining individuals without respect for their fair trial guarantees or other applicable rights. Foreigners, including U.S. citizens, are not excluded from this practice. U.S. citizens traveling or residing in Burma may be detained and regime authorities could deny access to U.S. consular services or information about the alleged crime.

Local law enforcement officials may detain and/or deport U.S. citizens for speaking out or protesting against the military regime, including on their personal social media accounts, and for sending private electronic messages critical of the military regime. Facebook and X (Twitter) are banned in Burma. Police have sought bribes from individuals using a virtual private network (VPN) to access social media sites even though VPN use is legal.

Burma has limited and/or inadequate healthcare and emergency medical resources due to critical staffing shortages in the public sector health workforce. Importation of medical supplies, including medicine, into Burma is not consistent and medical prescriptions and over-the-counter medicine may not be available.

Burma’s military conscription law was first introduced in 2010 but historically was not widely implemented. The military regime officially implemented the law in April 2024. In general, Burmese males aged 18 to 35 and Burmese females aged 18 to 27 will need to register for military service and report for duty if ordered by regime authorities. Burmese males aged 18 to 45 and Burmese females aged 18 to 35 in specific expert/professional occupations must serve if called upon by the regime. For more information, please refer to the Myanmar People’s Military Service Law (State Peace and Development Council Law No. 27/2010), also known as the Public Military Service Law. The military regime may refuse to acknowledge U.S.-Burmese dual nationals’ U.S. citizenship, prevent their departure from Burma, and/or conscript them into the military. U.S.-Burmese nationals should consider this issue before traveling to Burma.

Read the Country Information page for additional information on travel to Burma.

If you decide to travel to Burma:

  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Follow the Embassy on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Follow the Embassy’s Consular Section on Facebook.
  • Review the Country Security Report for Burma.
  • Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel. 
  • Purchase travel medical insurance that covers Burma and includes medical evacuation. 
  • Do not touch unknown metal objects and avoid traveling off well-used roads, tracks, and paths due to risk of unexploded ordnance. 
  • Keep travel documents up to date and easily accessible. 
  • Make contingency plans to leave the country. 
  • Review local laws and conditions before traveling.  
  • Review our website on Dual-Nationality
  • Visit our website for High-Risk Area Travelers.   
  • Share important documents, login information, and points of contact with loved ones so that they can manage your affairs if you are unable to return as planned to the United States. 
  • Review Ready.gov’s Financial Preparedness webpage.
  • Develop a communication plan with family and/or your employer or host organization.
  • Erase any sensitive photos, comments, or other materials that could be considered controversial or provocative by local groups from your social media pages, cameras, laptops, and other electronic devices prior to travel.

Qatar - Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

Reissued with obsolete COVID-19 page links removed.

Exercise normal precautions in Qatar.

Due to risks to civil aviation operating within the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman region, including Qatar, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued an advisory Notice to Air Missions (NOTAM) and/or a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR). For more information U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Qatar.

If you decide to travel to Qatar:

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